What’s New in 3DEXPERIENCE Works Structural Simulation

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The simulation possibilities for SOLIDWORKS® users continue to expand. Now users can solve any finite element analysis (FEA) problem with confidence by easily leveraging SIMULIA’s structural simulation functionality on the platform.

The 3DEXPERIENCE® Works portfolio of cloud solutions brings your team together on a single collaborative platform that enables you to move from ideation through delivery seamlessly.

Here are my top three favorite enhancements in the latest release.

Improve Design Productivity with SOLIDWORKS Multi-bodies

You can now streamline the design/simulation process using the SOLIDWORKS multi-bodies of a part. This commonly used design technique simulates the interaction of assembly components.

Until now, multi-bodies have not been usable in SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD for applying different materials or creating interactions between each body, such as contact interactions. This can lead to time-consuming reconstruction of a CAD model.

With the new release you can make multi-bodies created in SOLIDWORKS immediately available for high-end simulation by leveraging the 3DEXPERIENCE platform—without extra steps. Each body is treated as an assembly component, so different materials and interactions, such as contact between bodies and connections, can be applied. This streamlines your design/simulation process.SOLIDWORKS data, including geometrical multi-bodies, simulation studies, and materials, are fully supported on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform when using SIMULIA apps.

Geometrical multi-bodies in a single part treated as assembly components in simulation

Displacement results of a static simulation treating multi-bodies as assembly components

Automatic Simplification of 3D Axisymmetric Models

When making various kinds of structures, it often takes considerable time to solve complex 3D models accurately. This applies not only to computational time but also to set-up time and to post-processing visualization time.

For structures of revolution (symmetry around an axis) such as rubber boots, seals/gaskets, tubes, pipes, wheels, disks, bottles, etc. that are subjected to axisymmetric loading, the new and fully automated axisymmetric finite element model (FEM) saves considerable computational time with increased stress accuracy. Computational savings equal a 10+ gain factor compared to 3D model computational time.

This solution is fully automated; the set-up is quick and easy. The simplification is done directly from the SOLIDWORKS 3D model, and it solves with the Abaqus simulation technology. Furthermore, it is associative, so the simulation model updates in one-click when the SOLIDWORKS geometry changes.

Automated FEM simplifies the 3D CAD model around its symmetrical axis

2D plot of the simulation results (solved drastically faster)

3D plot of the simulation results

Instant Communication of the Simulation Results in 3D

Designers and engineers love to solve technical problems; that’s what we do. However, like anyone, we can often overlook collaboration and communication. Accessing the right information early enough is a critical component of successful product development. Lack of timely access leads to inefficiency, frustration, and costly delays.

With the structural simulation products on the 3DEXPERIENCE Works platform, you can now share lightweight simulation result animations in a chat conversation. Now anyone on your team can securely review your simulation results from any location with a simple web browser. The ability to instantly share lightweight results means design decisions can be made faster.

By connecting SOLIDWORKS, the most popular CAD system, with SIMULIA, the most powerful and reliable simulation technology (with Abaqus for structure), on a single platform, 3DEXPERIENCE Works offers you a powerful product development environment. The ability to easily share the latest engineering information between designers,

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